The Crime of Living Cautiously

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Short post today since I’m behind the pile, but I wanted to at least point out one thing.

I’ve seen many proposals and new books on this recently, so I don’t think it’s a stretch to say there’s a trend emerging. It has much to do with Mark Bertrand’s post of July 29th “Safe or Good?” on the Narnian view of our terrifyingly holy God. I think I mentioned it before, but I want to draw your attention to one of these new books I’ve recently received.

You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you stop to look fear in the face… You must do the thing you think you cannot do. –Eleanor Roosevelt

Security is mostly superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either daring adveture, or nothing. –Hellen Keller

Luci Shaw’s new book The Crime of Living Cautiously” is an exciting read so far, a meditation on the art of living dangerously, rather than assuming God wants us to “be careful little eyes what we see.” So far I’m unable to process it all, but I plan to give a full report very soon. Check back in a couple days and I’ll try to have some other good food for thought from the book.

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5 thoughts on “The Crime of Living Cautiously”

  1. Apropos of little, the strangest sight for me at CBA was the “commercial” IVP(?) was running on Marriott’s in-hotel channel featuring Luci Shaw bungee-jumping…and then talking about this book. Did anyone else see this? Or was it just some altitude-induced hallucination?

  2. I’ll look forward to reading/hearing more about the book. But if it’s only about the crime of being cautious about physical escapades, it’s not for me. Two herniated discs in my neck will forever prevent me from being dumb enough to bungee jump, although I’m working up the courage to carry in my own groceries… :) Spiritual and emotional courage, I could use, though. I hope that’s what Luci’s book is really about!

  3. Hey, Mick.
    I’ll be curious to see what you have to say about this. Dangerous purely for dangerous’ sake sounds like foolishness to me. You shall not tempt the Lord thy God, after all. But, on the other hand, we can’t live in fear. (Heck, I’m the girl who says the faster and steeper the better–whether you’re talking roller coasters or snow skis.) Don’t you suppose obedience has a lot to do with when we should launch into dangerous territory?
    After Jacob’s near drowning, George and I could have succumbed to the temptation to overprotect our other kids. By God’s grace we’ve had the freedom to let them live adventuresome lives. Luke loves wilderness camping, kayaking, snowboarding, etc. He’s has been studying in England all summer. Grace left yesterday for a post-college-graduation, two-month trek through Europe with a girlfriend. She took nothing but what would fit in a large-ish backpack.
    I marvel at their gumption. Sure, I’m a little nervous, but I’m mostly thrilled and excited. What amazing memories they’ll carry their whole lives! I know God is with them, and He is able to keep them. I also know from experience bad things could happen to them, should God have a purpose in allowing it. That being the case, I’m particularly curious as to the theology behind this book’s assertions.
    Yeah, so I’m kind of rambling here. I suppose I should shut up and wait till you lay it all out, eh? Don’t keep us in suspense too long.

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